Tag Archives: Regulations

Chinese Government Issues Draft List of Products Covered by China RoHS2

On June 29, 2017, China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) issued a draft list of 12 consumer products that would be required to comply with hazardous substance restrictions under the country’s RoHS2 law, which is the same list of substances included under the European Union’s RoHS Directive. Feedback will be accepted until July […]

Get your questions on export control regulations answered at IPC APEX EXPO

Learn about the new export control regulations and changes to ITAR restrictions for electronics

IPC President’s Message – Attend IPC Capitol Hill Day 2013 (An IPC Members-only Event)

IPC President and CEO John Mitchell extends a special invitation to IPC members to join their colleagues on June 19-20 in Washington, D.C., as IPC hosts its Capitol Hill Day.

IPC Suggests Congressional Oversight on Three Burdensome Regulations

IPC recently sent a letter to the new chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee regarding burdensome regulations in need of Congressional oversight. The letter highlighted three regulations that have or will have a significant impact on electronics manufacturers:  the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) proposed modifications to the Toxic Substances Control Act Inventory Update […]

GOOD NEWS: ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY UNAFFECTED AFTER A YEAR OF EFFORTS

A recent Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) ruling found that inaccessible electronic components in children’s products will not be subject to the lead limits that were enacted last summer under the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA). This finding is critical to the electronics industry because electronics manufacturers building children’s products will not need to meet CPSIA lead limits, which are lower than the limits in the European Union Restriction on Hazardous Substances Directive.

In the same ruling, CPSC stated that inaccessible component parts do not have to be tested and certified as to the lead content. This means that electronics manufacturers will not be required to conduct expensive third party testing of inaccessible component parts for lead content.