IPC Submits Comments on Reducing Regulatory Burdens on Manufacturing

On March 27, 2017, IPC filed comments in response to a March 7, 2017 Department of Commerce (DOC) Request for Information on the Impact (RFI) of Federal Regulations on Domestic Manufacturing.

In our comments, IPC noted the burden imposed on manufacturers by regulations and our support of cost-effective, science-based regulations. IPC’s comments identified a number of specific regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that should be reviewed, withdrawn, or amended.

IPC will follow up on its submissions to ensure that as many concerns as possible are addressed.

One Comment

  1. Posted April 10, 2017 at 4:31 pm | Permalink

    The following comments are made as an individual IPC member and not on behalf of or as spokesperson for TE Connectivity. Publicly available information on corporate responsibility may be found at http://www.te.com/usa-en/about-te/corporate-responsibility.html

    I endorse all the items in this thoughtful response to the RFI. Regulations that have little benefit to the environment or health, or are conflicting or redundant, should be revised.

    Regarding the statement in paragraph 2, “Regulations based on ideological predispositions, instead of science…” must never be allowed, much less be propagated by purposefully restricting scientific funding for topics that are currently met with denial. Furthermore, gagging free and open scientific communication and debate is abhorrent and in total opposition to American roots and values.

    Even worse would be the broad-stroke elimination of basic regulations on pollution and air and water standards, which will cause degradation of the environment, compromised health, and increased death rates. The result would be widespread, significant negative impacts on all aspects of our country including, but not limited to, commerce and the economy.


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