Talk to the car

The auto industry is undergoing an incredible amount of change as vehicle designers embrace electronic technologies. For those in the high reliability, low volume marketplace, the potential market for vehicle to infrastructure communications may emerge as a solid market.

Industry and governmental researchers have been looking at V2I, as vehicle to infrastructure is often abbreviated, for a few years. In 2013 and 2014, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) will determine whether to mandate V2i and vehicle to vehicle communications in passenger cars and commercial trucks, respectively.

If NHTSA suggests such a mandate, rule makers will spend a few years deciding exactly how the mandate will be implemented. So this isn’t exactly a market that EMS providers and PCB fabricators need to race to examine.

Vehicle to vehicle communications could eventually be a high volume market for boards that sit in cars and trucks. But infrastructure equipment will sit in towers next to roadsides and atop stoplights – applications that require very high reliability. Given the state of government funding, it’s doubtful that this will turn into a high volume market for years, if ever.

While the timeframe is long, it’s an equally long cycle to convince the auto industry that you’re a player. So this may be the right time to start attending meetings and making your name known. High reliability markets take time to crack, but they also hold the promise of lengthy production cycles. Whether V2I takes hold or note, it may be worth examining today rather than waiting until the potential’s known.
The auto industry is undergoing an incredible amount of change as vehicle designers embrace electronic technologies. For those in the high reliability, low volume marketplace, the potential market for vehicle to infrastructure communications may emerge as a solid market.

Industry and governmental researchers have been looking at V2I, as vehicle to infrastructure is often abbreviated, for a few years. In 2013 and 2014, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) will determine whether to mandate V2i and vehicle to vehicle communications in passenger cars and commercial trucks, respectively.

If NHTSA suggests such a mandate, rule makers will spend a few years deciding exactly how the mandate will be implemented. So this isn’t exactly a market that EMS providers and PCB fabricators need to race to examine.

Vehicle to vehicle communications could eventually be a high volume market for boards that sit in cars and trucks. But infrastructure equipment will sit in towers next to roadsides and atop stoplights – applications that require very high reliability. Given the state of government funding, it’s doubtful that this will turn into a high volume market for years, if ever.

While the timeframe is long, it’s an equally long cycle to convince the auto industry that you’re a player. So this may be the right time to start attending meetings and making your name known. High reliability markets take time to crack, but they also hold the promise of lengthy production cycles. Whether V2I takes hold or note, it may be worth examining today rather than waiting until the potential’s known.

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