IPC Suggests Congressional Oversight on Three Burdensome Regulations

IPC recently sent a letter to the new chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee regarding burdensome regulations in need of Congressional oversight. The letter highlighted three regulations that have or will have a significant impact on electronics manufacturers:  the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) proposed modifications to the Toxic Substances Control Act Inventory Update Reporting rule, EPA’s re-opening of the Definition of Solid Waste rule, and the Security and Exchange Commission’s proposed regulations on conflict minerals.

The letter was sent in response to Chairman Darrell Issa’s (R-CA-49) request for IPC’s assistance in identifying existing regulations that have negatively impacted job growth within our industry. Rep. Issa also invited IPC to name proposed regulations, which if finalized, would negatively impact job growth. Our letter to Chairman Issa details three regulations that will impose costly and unnecessary regulatory requirements on U.S. electronics manufacturers and therefore deserve Congressional oversight.

IPC strongly believes that the EPA’s proposed modifications to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Inventory Update Reporting (IUR) Rule warrant oversight. The EPA’s proposed modifications to the TSCA IUR rule would require all manufacturers that send byproducts for recycling to report those byproducts as new chemicals. This proposed rule will create burdensome, costly and unnecessary regulatory requirements that penalize manufacturers for doing the right thing – recycling. IPC strongly encouraged Rep. Issa to conduct oversight of EPA’s proposed changes to the TSCA IUR rule to ensure manufacturers are not unduly burdened by unreasonable reporting requirements. View more information on TSCA IUR here.  

Congressional oversight is needed on the EPA’s reopening of the Definition of Solid Waste (DSW) rule. The EPA’s decision to reopen the DSW rule, which was finalized in October 2008,  has delayed implementation of this important rule to increase recycling of industrial byproducts by reducing regulatory burdens. We urged oversight on the EPA’s attempts to undermine the ability of the DSW rule to promote the recycling of secondary materials. View more information and IPC actions on DSW here.

Oversight is also necessary for the Security and Exchange Commission’s (SEC’s) development and implementation of regulations on conflict minerals. The regulations being developed by the SEC, in accordance with Section 1502 of the recent Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, could impose extremely burdensome reporting requirements on manufacturers that use tin, gold, tantalum, and tungsten in their products. Although reporting requirements only apply to companies required to report to the SEC, it is expected that these requirements will rapidly be passed through the entire supply chain. We encouraged the Chairman’s office to work with the SEC in an oversight capacity to ensure the development of regulations meet legislative intent without unduly burdening U.S. manufacturing. View more information and IPC actions on conflict minerals here.

View IPC’s letter to Chairman Issa.  

For more information and to get involved in providing input on proposed regulations impacting your company  please visit www.ipc.org/gr or contact Fern Abrams, IPC director of government relations and environmental policy at +1 703-522-0225 or fabrams@ipc.org.

Post a Comment

Required fields are marked *

*
*

%d bloggers like this: